Regarding Music Piracy

This is an issue I feel pretty strongly about, but a lot of people simply do not comprehend that there is even an issue with it. Sometimes when I argue the point, people accuse me of having no evidence for what I’m saying.

So here is respected veteran musician and label owner Chris Cutler giving his opinion on the matter.

People out there can think what they want to think, but if they operate under the premise that illegally downloading music is in any way a noble anti-establishment ethos, some in-action statement of an anarchist philosophy, maybe they should read articles like this.

http://www.thewire.co.uk/articles/6715/ 

2 thoughts on “Regarding Music Piracy

  1. With regards to music piracy and from an ethical standpoint, I believe an artist has every right to be angry and seek legal action when their recordings are unwillingly sold for profit or bootlegged by a shady record label or download site. It’s the intellectual property of the artist, who typically writes and composes their own songs. Not to mention, the artist has developed their own way of performing a song, which is documented within the recording.

    In 2011, a judge ruled in favor of singer Paul Collins, whose rock group The Beat lost substantial revenue from a series of unauthorized bootleg recordings released by an underground record label. The recordings were unknowingly engineered during The Beat’s tours with The Police, Eddie Money and The Cure. Although the label argued that the recordings were tracked and mixed by an independent investor during the 1970s and 1980s, Collins was unaware of these dealings and was awarded an unspecified amount of damages. Collins was granted permission to digitally re-master and officially release the live recordings. In response to backlash and negative publicity from fans accusing him of being greedy, Collins attempted to make a public statement about piracy. In 2012, Collins made the recordings available to everyone as free MP3 download tracks to fans worldwide.

    Some fans might argue that Metallica was selfish to target Napster for illegally offering their music as MP3s. In all fairness, not everyone victimized by piracy are platinum-selling, wealthy artists in the caliber of Metallica. Paul Collins had just as much right to take legal action, but he turned the negative situation into a positive one by publicly releasing the pirated material as free downloads to his fans. Case in point, not all rock stars are selfish or “only in it for the money.” Musicians have a right to be paid for their intellectual property. People who support music piracy only think about themselves. If a musician isn’t being paid for their work, how are they supposed to continue recording, writing, performing and touring? Musicians aren’t slaves and if they aren’t making enough money to function, then they might choose a different career path that doesn’t involve making music.

  2. Exactly. At lot of people think it’s as simple as “music should be free”, but music is a luxury, and it’s often expensive to produce. Because music is now available in small files that take seconds to download and sound “good enough” over shitty speakers, it’s been utterly devalued.

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